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K. Michelle Shows That ‘All Monsters Are Human’ On Her New Album

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JANUARY 23: K. Michelle performs at the BET Music Showcase at City Market ... [+] Social House on January 23, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Noel Vasquez/Getty Images for BET) Getty Images for BET As a former reality TV star, R&B singer K. Michelle knows what it means to…
K. Michelle Shows That ‘All Monsters Are Human’ On Her New Album

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BET Music Showcase – Grammy Weekend 2020

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 23: K. Michelle performs at the BET Music Showcase at City Market … [+] Social House on January 23, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Noel Vasquez/Getty Images for BET)

Getty Images for BET

As a former reality TV star, R&B singer K. Michelle knows what it means to put all of one’s own business out in the open. Following her stint on Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta in the early 2010s, the Tennessee-raised singer launched her singing career in earnest after signing with Atlantic Records. In the years since then, K. Michelle has released album after album of increasingly personal material, first opening up her soul on her 2014 LP Anybody Wanna Buy a Heart? and continuing to bear her trauma on More Issues Than Vogue and Kimberly: The People I Used to Know.
The release of her fifth studio album All Monsters Are Human is K. Michelle’s latest attempt at delivering music that speaks to listeners’ souls as she tells them different heart-wrenching stories from her life. Album opener “Just Like Jay” outlines some of these troubles, which ranged from romantic betrayal and suicidal thoughts to implant illness and her departure from Atlantic Records.

Lead single “The Rain”—like songs by artists including Big Sean—samples New Edition’s 1988 hit “Can You Stand the Rain,” putting an upbeat R&B twist on a beloved classic. “Supahood,” another previously released single, stands out as the album’s most hardline hip hop track, with guest appearances by Kash Doll and the City Girls complementing K. Michelle’s vocals with generic lyrics about untrustworthy men and low-level crime.

Despite the standout nature of heartfelt tracks like “Ciara’s Prayer” and “I Don’t Like You” and more radio-ready offerings like “Love On Me,” All Monsters Are Human registers as an otherwise solid offering from K. Michelle. While the new material is a much-welcome glimpse into the mind of the singer, it also struggles in distinguishing itself from her previous albums. At the very least, fans of R&B will be able to pick out a few songs to incorporate into their regular rotation.
“>BET Music Showcase – Grammy Weekend 2020
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 23: K. Michelle performs at the BET Music Showcase at City Market … [+] Social House on January 23, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Noel Vasquez/Getty Images for BET)
Getty Images for BET
As a former reality TV star, R&B singer K. Michelle knows what it means to put all of one’s own business out in the open. Following her stint on Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta in the early 2010s, the Tennessee-raised singer launched her singing career in earnest after signing with Atlantic Records. In the years since then, K. Michelle has released album after album of increasingly personal material, first opening up her soul on her 2014 LP Anybody Wanna Buy a Heart? and continuing to bear her trauma on More Issues Than Vogue and Kimberly: The People I Used to Know.
The release of her fifth studio album All Monsters Are Human is K. Michelle’s latest attempt at delivering music that speaks to listeners’ souls as she tells them different heart-wrenching stories from her life. Album opener “Just Like Jay” outlines some of these troubles, which ranged from romantic betrayal and suicidal thoughts to implant illness and her departure from Atlantic Records.

Lead single “The Rain”—like songs by artists including Big Sean—samples New Edition’s 1988 hit “Can You Stand the Rain,” putting an upbeat R&B twist on a beloved classic. “Supahood,” another previously released single, stands out as the album’s most hardline hip hop track, with guest appearances by Kash Doll and the City Girls complementing K. Michelle’s vocals with generic lyrics about untrustworthy men and low-level crime.

Despite the standout nature of heartfelt tracks like “Ciara’s Prayer” and “I Don’t Like You” and more radio-ready offerings like “Love On Me,” All Monsters Are Human registers as an otherwise solid offering from K. Michelle. While the new material is a much-welcome glimpse into the mind of the singer, it also struggles in distinguishing itself from her previous albums. At the very least, fans of R&B will be able to pick out a few songs to incorporate into their regular rotation.

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