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A stolen Supreme Court seat drives a day of Women’s March protests

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By Adam Rosenberg2020-10-18 16:05:39 UTC "His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period." That was Women's March executive director Rachel O'Leary Carmona speaking on Saturday in Washington, D.C. to kick off a day of protest. It was almost four years ago now, just a day after Donald…
A stolen Supreme Court seat drives a day of Women’s March protests

By Adam Rosenberg2020-10-18 16:05:39 UTC

“His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period.”
That was Women’s March executive director Rachel O’Leary Carmona speaking on Saturday in Washington, D.C. to kick off a day of protest. It was almost four years ago now, just a day after Donald Trump’s Jan. 20, 2017 inauguration, that thousands of protesters converged on D.C. to protest the seating of a president who speaks for less than half the country.
That was the first official Women’s March of the Trump era.
Now, on Oct. 17, 2020 and with just a couple weeks to go before voters (or perhaps the courts) decide whether or not Trump gets a second term, it’s the perfect moment for another such rally. There were plenty to go around on Saturday, with protesters gathering in major cities and small towns from coast to coast to publicly voice their dissatisfaction with four years of regression under Trump.
Many of the signs and other protest displays attendees brandished shared a similar theme of supporting women’s rights, with a particular pro-abortion focus in the midst of a looming and seemingly assured Supreme Court appointment for Amy Coney Barrett. Trump’s pick to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg is viewed by most as an abortion opponent who could be critical to reversing the court’s historic Roe v. Wade decision.

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Barrett’s imminent, norm-shaking SCOTUS appointment wasn’t the only topic of the day, however. Rallygoers brought their energy to the streets as they cried foul on the divisive rhetoric from Trump that’s torn apart the social fabric of the country for four straight years. 
From the Black Lives Matter movement and a growing understanding of systemic racism’s insidious influence on U.S. society to the president’s persistent misogyny and the history of misconduct allegations he faces, protesters weren’t about to let Trump off the hook for anything. 

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It was a powerful show of unity in the midst of a historic and potentially transformative election. Here’s hoping that energy transforms into the kind of voter turnout that can sweep out the trash that’s accumulated in D.C. these past four years. Please do your part and vote before or by Election Day on Nov. 3.

Image: Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images
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