New language test for those wanting to become permanent residents

New language test for those wanting to become permanent residents

Immigrants who wish to become permanent residents will be required to sit an English test as concerns grow about social fragmentation.

The number of people living in Australia who speak little or no English is rising rapidly, and forecast to reach one million within just three years.

Citizenship Minister Alan Tudge is expected to announce the new conversation test plans in a speech to the Sydney Institute on Thursday. 

The number of people living in Australia who speak little or no English is rising rapidly, and forecast to reach one million within just three years (stock image)

Mr Tudge will say the government is concerned with the growing number of people who cannot communicate in English (stock image)

Mr Tudge will cite large cities like Sydney and Melbourne, which together are home to 67 suburbs where more than 50 per cent of people were born overseas (stock image)

Mr Tudge will say the government is concerned with the growing number of people who cannot communicate in English, The Australian reported.

‘As we ­approach a million without English capability, we will begin to get more social fragmentation,’ Mr Tudge’s speech reads.

‘There are suburbs where up to one in three cannot speak the national language well or at all.

‘Further, because of the concentration in particular areas, there is less demand on the individuals to have to interact with other ­Australians.’ 

Citizenship Minister Alan Tudge (pictured) is expected to announce the new conversation test plans in a speech to the Sydney Institute on Thursday

Immigrants who wish to become permanent residents will be required to sit an English test as concerns grow about social fragmentation (stock image)

Mr Tudge will cite large cities like Sydney and Melbourne, which together are home to 67 suburbs where more than 50 per cent of people were born overseas.

Of those, 28 suburbs have populations with over 60 per cent of people overseas-born, many of whom do not speak English.

In one such suburb, Greater Dandenong in Melbourne’s south-east, 61.7 per cent of the 152,000 residents were born overseas, and 17 per cent do n

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